COVID-19 Vaccines in WA - Community Health Plan of Washington - Medicare Advantage

COVID-19 Vaccines in WA

COVID-19 Vaccines in Washington: What You Need to Know

COVID-19 vaccines are here! On this page, you’ll find resources and information about how the vaccines work, as well as Washington’s plan to distribute them. Find answers in the Frequently Asked Questions section.

Everyone 12 and older is eligible for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

All Washington residents age 12 and older are eligible to receive the two-dose Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has expanded COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to everyone 12 and older. Pfizer is the only authorized vaccine at this time for people ages 12 to 17 and requires parent or guardian consent. 

See what parents of minors should know about COVID-19 vaccines ➜

The Pfizer vaccine, which was already authorized for people 16 and older, has been proven to be safe and extremely effective for 12 to 15-year-olds. Vaccinating this age group will protect children and give parents peace of mind. This is the best step families can take to ensure their kids are healthy, remain in the classroom, can safely spend time with their friends, and take part in the activities they enjoy.

Learn what the Pfizer authorization means for your family ➜

Please use the COVID-19 Vaccine Locator to find and schedule an appointment. When scheduling an appointment for someone 12 to 17, make sure the location you choose administers the Pfizer vaccine, which is the only vaccine currently authorized for people that age. Anyone who wants the COVID-19 vaccine is able to get it, regardless of immigration or health insurance status.

All Washington residents age 18 and older are eligible for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccines, in addition to the Pfizer vaccine. The main difference is that Moderna and Pfizer require two doses to provide full protection, rather than one dose for J&J.

Where can I get the vaccine?

Here are some of the ways for Washington residents age 12 and older to get the vaccine.

If you or a loved one need help scheduling a COVID-19 vaccination, call 1-833-VAX-HELP (1-833-829-4357), then press #. The DOH is setting aside appointments for callers. Language assistance is available.

You can also text your zip code to 438-829 (GET VAX) or 822-862 (VACUNA) for vaccine locations near you.

Free and discounted rides are available to and from your vaccination from Lyft and Uber through July 4, 2021.

Home-based vaccination

If you or someone you know is homebound and unable to travel to a vaccine site, you may be able to get a vaccine in your home.

Fill out a survey with the Washington State Department of Health to request service. If you have questions, email [email protected].

Your provider or clinic

Your care provider or clinic may be able to give you the vaccine. Call them and ask!

Statewide vaccine locator tool

Use the DOH vaccine locator tool to find available COVID-19 vaccine appointments near you (within 50 miles). The vaccine locator includes real-time appointment availability and details to schedule an appointment. The tool is available in more than 30 languages.

Find a vaccine location near you ➜

Mass vaccination sites

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Washington State Department of Health (DOH), with assistance from the Washington National Guard and local and private sector partners, have launched mass vaccination sites throughout the state. They are open to Washington residents age 12 and older. Some locations have walk-up vaccinations, but appointments are encouraged.

*Click a site below to see details and how to make an appointment.

Auburn

Auburn is offering several thousand vaccinations per day, with no appointment needed. Auburn will administer both first and second doses. You can also schedule your appointment online. If you need help, please call 206-477-3977, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. for assistance.

If you are arriving for your second dose, bring your COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card, which you were given when you received your first dose. This card displays your first dose date and vaccine type.

The Auburn mass vaccination site administers Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccines. For people ages 12 to 17, Pfizer-BioNTech is the only authorized vaccine at this time and minors will need a parent present to provide consent.

  • Location: Auburn Outlet Mall -1101 Outlet Collection Way, Suite 1333, Auburn, WA 98001
  • Vaccination without an appointment is available Sunday through Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • A “Park and vaccinate” service offering vaccination in your car is available on Mondays only, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Ask a parking attendant about this option when you arrive.
  • Vaccines: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson (J&J)
Federal Way

Federal Way will administer both first and second doses on Saturdays and Sundays only. You do NOT need to be a Kaiser Permanente member to get an appointment. Please make your appointment online. To schedule by phone, call 1-877-832-9915, Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and Saturday 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Interpreters are available – say your preferred language when connected.

If you are arriving for your second dose, bring your COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card, which you were given when you received your first dose. This card displays your first dose date and vaccine type.

The Federal Way mass vaccination site administers Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnsons (J&J) vaccines. For people ages 12 to 17, Pfizer-BioNTech is the only authorized vaccine at this time and minors will need a parent present to provide consent.

  • Location: Kaiser Permanente Federal Way Medical Center  – 301 South 320th Street, Federal Way, WA 98003
  • Sat, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sun, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Vaccines: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson (J&J)
Kent

Kent is offering several thousand vaccinations per day, with no appointment needed. Kent will administer both first and second doses. You can also schedule your appointment online. If you need help, please call 206-477-3977, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. for assistance.

If you are arriving for your second dose, bring your COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card, which you were given when you received your first dose. This card displays your first dose date and vaccine type.

The Kent mass vaccination site administers Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. For people ages 12 to 17, Pfizer-BioNTech is the only authorized vaccine at this time and minors will need a parent present to provide consent.

  • Location: Kent accesso ShoWare – 625 W James St, Kent, WA 98032
  • Vaccination without an appointment is available Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Vaccines: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson (J&J)
Seattle

The City of Seattle is offering several thousand vaccinations per day, with no appointment needed at fixed vaccination sites at Rainier Beach and Sodo. Seattle will administer both first and second doses for people 12 years-old and older. While you do not need an appointment to get vaccinated, booking an appointment often results in a faster vaccination experience. You can also call the Seattle Customer Service Bureau at (206) 684-2489, Monday-Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for assistance. Interpretation is available over the phone.

Seattle has the Pfizer vaccine for people ages 12 and older, and the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccines for people ages 18 and older. Minors will require authorization from a parent or legal guardian in the registration process. 

Locations:

  • Rainier Beach Community Vaccination Hub – 8702 Seward Park Ave S, Seattle, WA 98118
    • Open from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm from Monday to Saturday. No appointment is necessary. Permanently closes end of the day of June 23, 2021.
  • Sodo Drive-thru Vaccination and Testing Site  – 3820 6th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98108
    • Open 9:00 am to 4:00 pm from Monday to Saturday. No appointment is necessary. Will remain open through the summer!

Vaccines:

  • Pfizer BioNTech, Moderna and Johnson and Johnson (J&J)
Wenatchee

The Wenatchee mass vaccination site is now being led by the Chelan-Douglas Health District. For more information, including appointment registration at Town Toyota Center, visit the Chelan-Douglas Health District’s website.

The Wenatchee mass vaccination site administers Pfizer-BioNTech, which is a two-dose series authorized for people 12 and older. The second dose should be administered three weeks (21 days) after the first dose.

  • Location: Town Toyota Center – 1300 Walla Walla Ave, Wenatchee, WA
  • Monday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • Vaccine: Pfizer BioNTech
Yakima

Yakima administers first and second doses of Pfizer-BioNTech, as well as second doses of Moderna. Please make your appointment online using PrepMod. Same day appointments are available, and walk-ins are welcome. If you need help, please call the COVID-19 hotline at 1-800-525-0127, then press #. Language assistance is available. Call 2-1-1 for free transportation.

If you are arriving for your second dose, bring your COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card, which you were given when you received your first dose. This card displays your first dose date and vaccine type.

Pfizer-BioNTech is a two-dose series authorized for people 12 and older. The second dose should be administered three weeks (21 days) after the first dose. The site also administers second doses of Moderna, which should be administered one month (28 days) after the first dose.

  • Location: Central Washington State Fair Park – 1301 S Fair Ave., Yakima, WA 98901
  • Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Vaccines: Pfizer BioNTech (1st and 2nd dose) and Moderna (2nd dose only)

Life After Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

*Click to see answers about life after vaccine in the state of Washington.

What does “fully vaccinated” mean?

You are considered fully vaccinated for COVID-19 two weeks after you get your second shot if you had to get two doses (Pfizer BioNTech or Moderna), or two weeks after you get a single-dose Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine.

If you don’t meet these requirements, you are NOT fully vaccinated.

If you’re not fully vaccinated yet:
  • Find a COVID-19 vaccine!
  • Wear a well-fitted mask and stay 6 feet (2 meters) apart in all public places.
  • Keep gatherings small and outdoors or indoors with the windows open.
  • Wear masks and stay 6 feet (2 meters) apart if you’re gathering with other people who are not yet vaccinated.
  • If no one in your household is at high risk for severe COVID-19 illness, you can visit with one fully vaccinated household without masks and physical distance.
  • Get tested for COVID-19 if you’re experiencing symptoms or know you’ve been exposed to someone with COVID-19.
  • Continue to avoid travel unless it is essential. If you do travel, get tested for COVID-19 before and after traveling and quarantine for seven days after traveling.
What should I keep doing once I'm fully vaccinated?

➔ Life After Vaccine FAQs

Even if you’re fully vaccinated, you should still:

What can I start doing once I'm fully vaccinated?

➔ Gathering Safely Once Vaccinated

Once you’re fully vaccinated, you:

  • Can visit with other fully vaccinated people without physical distancing or wearing masks.
  • Can visit with people who haven’t been vaccinated and are from one other household who are all at low risk for severe COVID-19 illness – indoors without physical distancing and wearing masks.
  • Can travel domestically without a pre- or post-travel test. And you don’t need to quarantine.
  • Do not need to quarantine or get tested after being exposed to someone with COVID-19 if you have no symptoms.
  • Should treat your vaccination paper card like a birth certificate or other official document! Take a photo of it and then store it at home. In the future, you may need to prove you’re vaccinated against COVID-19. Even now, many businesses are offering perks to vaccinated people.
  • Should keep an official proof of vaccination with you. See examples here: Visual Guide to Official Washington State Proof of COVID-19 Vaccination (PDF)

Source: Washington Department of Health

COVID-19 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

*Click to see answers about COVID-19 vaccines in the state of Washington.

Are the COVID-19 vaccines safe? They were developed so fast, so how can I be sure?

Use of Johnson & Johnson (J&J) Vaccine Resumed

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has immediately resumed the use of the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine statewide for everyone age 18 years and older, following the guidance of the FDA and CDC. After a review of all available data, the J&J vaccine’s known and potential benefits outweigh its known and potential risks for those recommended to receive it.

The J&J vaccine was paused for 11 days due to reports of a rare, but serious side effect of blood clots with low platelets (thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, or TTS) in women under age 50. This side effect is rare, occurring at a rate of about 7 per 1 million vaccinated women between 18 and 49 years old. For women 50 years and older and men of all ages, this side effect is even more rare. The concern and pause was only associated with the J&J vaccine, not the Moderna or Pfizer BioNTech vaccines.

If you get the J&J vaccine, or have received it recently, watch for the possible symptoms of a blood clot with low platelets for three weeks after receiving the vaccine and seek medical care right away if you develop any. Remember, it is normal to have mild to moderate symptoms, including fever, headache, fatigue, and joint/muscle pain, during the first week after receiving any COVID-19 vaccine. If you have any questions at all, call your doctor, nurse, or clinic.

COVID-19 vaccine safety is a top priority for the state and federal government, and reports of health problems following COVID-19 vaccination are taken very seriously. Detecting these rare side effects tells us that the systems in place to monitor the safety of these vaccines are working. The reports of a rare, but serious side effect of blood clots with low platelets were detected early, and the pause reflected the state and federal government’s commitment to transparency and safety as CDC and FDA gathered and reviewed additional data. COVID-19 vaccines have undergone and will continue to undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history.

If you are concerned about the increased risk of the J&J vaccine, Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines are available. The concern and pause was only associated with the J&J vaccine, not the Moderna or Pfizer BioNTech vaccines. The main difference is that Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech require two doses to provide full protection, rather than one dose for J&J. Please use the COVID-19 Vaccine Locator to find and schedule an appointment.

COVID-19 Vaccine Myth Busting

  • There is no question that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Millions of people in the U.S. have received shots.
  • The technology used to develop the first two COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in the U.S., from Moderna and Pfizer, is not new. It has been studied and used for decades in other medical research.
  • It’s true that the COVID vaccines were developed more quickly than other vaccines in the past. But they have been carefully tested in clinical trials involving tens of thousands of people. There were no serious safety concerns. The test results were reviewed and approved by several independent panels of experts.

CHPW hosted a virtual expert panel to answer questions and dispel myths about the COVID-19 vaccines. Here is the full recording of the talk held on Zoom on March 31.

Conversation in English

Conversación En Español


Are there side effects? Will the shot hurt or make me sick?

Use of Johnson & Johnson (J&J) Vaccine Resumed

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has immediately resumed the use of the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine statewide for everyone age 18 years and older, following the guidance of the FDA and CDC. After a review of all available data, the J&J vaccine’s known and potential benefits outweigh its known and potential risks for those recommended to receive it.

The J&J vaccine was paused for 11 days due to reports of a rare, but serious side effect of blood clots with low platelets (thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, or TTS) in women under age 50. This side effect is rare, occurring at a rate of about 7 per 1 million vaccinated women between 18 and 49 years old. For women 50 years and older and men of all ages, this side effect is even more rare. The concern and pause was only associated with the J&J vaccine, not the Moderna or Pfizer BioNTech vaccines.

If you get the J&J vaccine, or have received it recently, watch for the possible symptoms of a blood clot with low platelets for three weeks after receiving the vaccine and seek medical care right away if you develop any. Remember, it is normal to have mild to moderate symptoms, including fever, headache, fatigue, and joint/muscle pain, during the first week after receiving any COVID-19 vaccine. If you have any questions at all, call your doctor, nurse, or clinic.

COVID-19 vaccine safety is a top priority for the state and federal government, and reports of health problems following COVID-19 vaccination are taken very seriously. Detecting these rare side effects tells us that the systems in place to monitor the safety of these vaccines are working. The reports of a rare, but serious side effect of blood clots with low platelets were detected early, and the pause reflected the state and federal government’s commitment to transparency and safety as CDC and FDA gathered and reviewed additional data. COVID-19 vaccines have undergone and will continue to undergo the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history.

If you are concerned about the increased risk of the J&J vaccine, Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccines are available. The concern and pause was only associated with the J&J vaccine, not the Moderna or Pfizer BioNTech vaccines. The main difference is that Moderna and Pfizer BioNTech require two doses to provide full protection, rather than one dose for J&J. Please use the COVID-19 Vaccine Locator to find and schedule an appointment.

Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 Vaccines

  • Some people experience mild or moderate side effects; others don’t. The most common side effects are pain and swelling in the arm where you received the shot. You may also have fever, chills, tiredness, and headache.
  • These side effects are normal signs that your body is building protection. It means the vaccine is doing its job. It does not mean you have COVID-19. If the side effects don’t go away within a few days, or you have more serious symptoms, call your doctor.
Can I get COVID-19 from a COVID-19 vaccine?

No! You cannot get COVID-19 from the vaccine. None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines or vaccines currently in development in the U.S. contain the live virus that causes COVID. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

I have already had COVID. Do I still need to be vaccinated?

Experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus again.

How much will it cost me to get a COVID vaccine?
  • Nothing. The federal government is covering the vaccine for free to all people living in the United States.
  • You should not be charged any out-of-pocket costs. You should not get a bill from your provider or from the place where you got your shot.
  • Some providers may bill your health insurance plan an “administration fee” for giving you the vaccine. This is separate from the cost of the vaccine itself. Health plans, like CHPW, will cover the cost of any administration fee.
Was the COVID-19 vaccine tested on minorities and communities of color?
  • The COVID-19 vaccines were tested in clinical trials involving tens of thousands of people of all races and ethnicities—who gave their consent—to make sure the vaccines are safe.
  • In the trials, the vaccines protected adults of different races, ethnicities, and ages from the virus.

➔ Protect Your Family – Get Vaccinated for COVID-19
➔ Proteja a su familia Vacúnese contra la COVID-19
➔ Ilaali Qoyskaaga Iska tallaal COVID-19
➔ ቤተሰብዎን ይጠብቁ የኮቪድ-19 ክትባትን ይውሰዱ
➔ 保护您的家人– 接种新冠19疫苗
➔ Bảo vệ Gia đình Quý vị Chủng ngừa COVID-19

CHPW hosted a virtual expert panel to answer questions and dispel myths about the COVID-19 vaccines. Here is the full recording of the talk held on Zoom on March 31.

Conversation in English

Conversación En Español

Can I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant or planning to become pregnant?

If you’re pregnant, breastfeeding, or planning to become pregnant, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) strongly recommends you talk with your health care provider about whether the vaccine is right for you, based on your risk of exposure to COVID-19.

Does the COVID-19 vaccine cause infertility?

No. This is a myth circulated online by non-scientific sources. There is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility.

Will the vaccine damage or change my DNA?
  • No, this is not possible. Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines like Pfizer’s and Moderna’s never enter the cell nucleus, where the DNA, your genetic material, lives.
  • The vaccine is broken down quickly once it enters the cell and delivers the needed “message” to the cell’s machinery.
  • Imagine the vaccine enters your body with an instruction manual. Your immune system memorizes the manual so it can fight COVID-19. It can’t change your DNA.
Once I get the COVID-19 vaccine, I am protected for life, right?
  • COVID vaccines have only recently been developed, so it’s too early to know the how long they will protect you. There’s ongoing research to answer this question.
  • What we do know is that COVID-19 has caused very serious illness and death for a lot of people. If you get COVID-19, you also risk giving it to loved ones who may get very sick. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine is a safer choice.
When can I get the COVID-19 vaccine?
All Washington residents age 12 and older are eligible to receive the two-dose Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has expanded COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to everyone 12 and older. Pfizer is the only authorized vaccine at this time for people ages 12 to 17 and requires parent or guardian consent. 

See what parents of minors should know about COVID-19 vaccines ➜

The Pfizer vaccine, which was already authorized for people 16 and older, has been proven to be safe and extremely effective for 12 to 15-year-olds. Vaccinating this age group will protect children and give parents peace of mind. This is the best step families can take to ensure their kids are healthy, remain in the classroom, can safely spend time with their friends, and take part in the activities they enjoy.

Learn what the Pfizer authorization means for your family ➜

Please use the COVID-19 Vaccine Locator to find and schedule an appointment. When scheduling an appointment for someone 12 to 17, make sure the location you choose administers the Pfizer vaccine, which is the only vaccine currently authorized for people that age. Anyone who wants the COVID-19 vaccine is able to get it, regardless of immigration or health insurance status.

All Washington residents age 18 and older are eligible for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccines, in addition to the Pfizer vaccine. The main difference is that Moderna and Pfizer require two doses to provide full protection, rather than one dose for J&J.
Where can I get the vaccine?
  • Use the DOH vaccine locator tool to find available COVID-19 vaccine appointments near you (within 50 miles). The vaccine locator includes real-time appointment availability and details to schedule an appointment. The tool is available in more than 30 languages.
  • You can also check with your local Community Health Center clinic or doctor’s office to see if they are offering the vaccine.
  • If you or a loved one need help scheduling a COVID-19 vaccination, call 1-833-VAX-HELP (1-833-829-4357), then press #. The DOH is setting aside appointments for callers and can provide access to free and discounted rides to vaccine appointments. Language assistance is available.
  • If you or someone you know is homebound and unable to travel to a vaccine site, you may be able to get a vaccine in your home. Fill out a survey with the Washington State Department of Health to request service. If you have questions, email [email protected].
Can my child get vaccinated for COVID-19?

All Washington residents age 12 and older are eligible to receive the two-dose Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) has expanded COVID-19 vaccine eligibility to everyone 12 and older. Pfizer is the only authorized vaccine at this time for people ages 12 to 17 and requires parent or guardian consent. 

See what parents of minors should know about COVID-19 vaccines ➜

The Pfizer vaccine, which was already authorized for people 16 and older, has been proven to be safe and extremely effective for 12 to 15-year-olds. Vaccinating this age group will protect children and give parents peace of mind. This is the best step families can take to ensure their kids are healthy, remain in the classroom, can safely spend time with their friends, and take part in the activities they enjoy.

Learn what the Pfizer authorization means for your family ➜

Please use the COVID-19 Vaccine Locator to find and schedule an appointment. When scheduling an appointment for someone 12 to 17, make sure the location you choose administers the Pfizer vaccine, which is the only vaccine currently authorized for people that age. Anyone who wants the COVID-19 vaccine is able to get it, regardless of immigration or health insurance status.

All Washington residents age 18 and older are eligible for the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccines, in addition to the Pfizer vaccine. The main difference is that Moderna and Pfizer require two doses to provide full protection, rather than one dose for J&J.
English is not my first language. Can I get COVID-19 vaccine information in other languages?

Yes. The CDC has a webpage with vaccine information that you can view in other languages. Just click on the “Languages” tab.

➔ Protect Your Family – Get Vaccinated for COVID-19
➔ Proteja a su familia Vacúnese contra la COVID-19
➔ Ilaali Qoyskaaga Iska tallaal COVID-19
➔ ቤተሰብዎን ይጠብቁ የኮቪድ-19 ክትባትን ይውሰዱ
➔ 保护您的家人– 接种新冠19疫苗
➔ Bảo vệ Gia đình Quý vị Chủng ngừa COVID-19

CHPW hosted a virtual expert panel to answer questions and dispel myths about the COVID-19 vaccines. Here is the full recording of the talk held on Zoom on March 31.

Conversación En Español

Conversation in English

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Washington Department of Health, American Academy of Family Physicians, National Association of Community Health Centers, CNN

DID YOU KNOW...?

A Nap a Day Could Keep The Doctor Away

An older man taking a nap on the couch.Many Americans do not get enough sleep and this can contribute to a number of health issues. Taking a nap during the day can help your body restore itself and promotes brain and heart health. A 20-minute nap has a variety of health benefits – from improved mood, to better focus and memory function. In some cultures, napping is even prescribed as a health treatment by doctors!

If you have trouble sleeping, take steps to improve your quality of sleep.

☏ HAVE QUESTIONS ?

Sales Team

Get real answers
from real people

Phone: 1-800-944-1247
Email: [email protected]

x